Accession Number:

ADP013764

Title:

Jet-Lag Syndrome

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

QINETIQ LTD FARNBOROUGH (UNITED KINGDOM) CENTRE FOR HUMAN SCIENCES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2002-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

Rapid travel across time zones leads to a lack of synchrony between the activity of the internal rhythm generating systems of an individual and the local social or environmental time cues of the new time zone. The internal circadian clock adapts slowly to this mismatch leading to the syndrome known as jet-lag. This syndrome is particularly characterized by sleep disturbances, reduced daytime alertness and performance, gastrointestinal symptoms and a general feeling of malaise. These symptoms are obviously undesirable for service personnel who are involved in intensive and sustained operations and who may have to deploy to a location involving travel across several time zones. Following north-south travel there are no problems with jet lag Buck et al., 1989 The adaptation of the circadian clock may take around one hour per day without countermeasures to adapt to a new time zone. However, around one third of travellers do not experience jet lag. In particular sleep disturbance is experienced by around 7807 of subjects after a transmeridian flight whereas after 3 nights only around 30 of subjects experienced disturbance. In another study 40 of subjects reported subjective weakness.

Subject Categories:

  • Terminal Flight Facilities
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE