Accession Number:

ADP006148

Title:

Remote Sensing of Interplanetary Shocks Using a Scintillation Method,

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CAMBRIDGE UNIV (UNITED KINGDOM) CAVENDISH LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1987-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

Energetic interplanetary disturbances originating at the Sun cause geomagnetic storms when they reach the Earth. The disturbances affect radio-communications, damage electrical power grid networks, increase the atmospheric density and drag on satellites, and are accompanied by showers of energetic particles which present radiation hazards to manned spacecraft. This paper describes a new ground-based method for locating and tracking transients in interplanetary space long before they reach the Earth. Continuous observations of transients during a two year period near support maximum have demonstrated the potential of the technique for predicting geomagnetic storms and given new information on the zones of the solar disk from which transients originate. The latter contradicts some widely held theories in solar-terrestrial physics and shows that a major revision of ideas is needed. Contrary to expectations, it has been found that open-magnetic field regions known as coronal holes are the dominant sources of the most powerful interplanetary shocks. This result conflicts with the solar flare theory of geomagnetic storms. Author

Subject Categories:

  • Radiofrequency Wave Propagation
  • Atmospheric Physics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE