Accession Number:

ADB125175

Title:

Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Mammalian Retina

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept. (Summary) 30 Sep 1983-29 Sep 1984

Corporate Author:

WAYNE STATE UNIV DETROIT MI

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1984-11-30

Pagination or Media Count:

29.0

Abstract:

This study is directed toward the cytochemical localization of cholinergic markers in a mammalian cat retina and biochemical characterization of the interactions of cholinergic neurons with other neurotransmitters in the retina. Particular attention is paid to localization of acetylcholinesterase and the effects of anticholinesterase organophosphates on normal retinal function. Studies to date have shown the presence of newly synthesized acetylcholine in amacrine and displaced amacrine cells. Acetylcholinesterase was localized in both amacrine and ganglion cells. The presumed cholinotoxin, AF64A, causes severe destruction in the cat retina, involving both amacrine and ganglion cells. Although the evidence to date indicates that only amacrine cells are cholinergic, ganglion cells appear to play a major role in cholinergic or related pathways and may be particularly susceptible to organophosphate poisoning. The biochemical component of the study has centered on the development of a superfusion system in which to monitor the release of various amino acid transmitters in response to application of acetylcholine. Preliminary experiments suggest that cholinergic amacrine cells are presynaptic to glycinergic cells in the cat retina. After the normal pattern has been established, it should be possible to investigate the effects of changes in the level of acetylcholinesterase on these responses.

Subject Categories:

  • Biochemistry
  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Toxicology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE