Accession Number:

ADA639961

Title:

Bat Azimuthal Echolocation Using Interaural Level Differences: Modeling and Implementation by a VLSI-Based Hardware System

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK DEPT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

203.0

Abstract:

Bats have long fascinated both scientists and engineers due to their superb ability to use echolocation to fly with speed and agility through complex natural environments in complete darkness. This dissertation presents a neuromorphic VLSI circuit model of bat azimuthal echolocation. Interaural level differences ILDs are the cues for bat azimuthal echolocation and are also the primary cues used by other mammals to localize high frequency sounds. The fact that neurons in bats respond to short echoes by one or two spikes strongly suggests that the conventionally used firing rate is an unlikely code. The operation of first spike latency in ILD computation and transformation is investigated in a network of spiking neurons linking the lateral superior olive LSO, dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus DNLL and inferior colliculus IC. The results of the investigation suggest that spatially distributed first spike latencies can serve as a fast code for azimuth that can be read-out by ascending stages. With the hardware echolocation model that uses spike timing representation, we study how multiple echoes can affect bat echolocation and demonstrate that the response to multiple sounds is not a simple linear addition of the response to single sounds. By developing functional models of the bat echolocation system, we can study the efficient implementation demonstrated by nature. For example, variations among analog VLSI circuit units due to the unavoidable transistor mismatch--traditionally thought of as a hurdle to overcome--have been found beneficial in generating the desired diversity of response that is similar to their neural counterparts. This work advocates the use and design of summating and exponentially decaying synapses.

Subject Categories:

  • Biology
  • Acoustic Detection and Detectors

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE