Accession Number:

ADA624133

Title:

National Policies for Military Unmanned Systems That Implement Joint Fires Missions

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2015-06-12

Pagination or Media Count:

106.0

Abstract:

Since September 11, 2001, the United States has used unmanned systems extensively around the world. These were primarily unmanned aircraft systems, but in the same years the technologies for ground and maritime both surface and sub-surface systems also matured significantly. In the coming years, unmanned systems with tremendous capabilities will be readily available in all of these areas. Technological advances in unmanned systems have expanded existing military capabilities. Despite the adoption of these technologies for military applications, policy guidance for U.S. national decision-makers has lagged the introduction of new capabilities. This thesis examines the current national-level policy guidance that exists for military unmanned systems capable of implementing joint fires missions both kinetic and non-kinetic, and identifies policy gaps based on the planned capabilities of unmanned systems. This thesis asserts that U.S. policies to constrain autonomy have been developed however, there are limits to the guidance provided for responses to aggression against U.S. unmanned systems or the use of adversary unmanned systems. It further asserts that policies should be publicly declared to signal U.S. intent, and that this guidance should include ground and maritime unmanned systems, not just airborne, as they are just as likely to affect U.S. international affairs.

Subject Categories:

  • Pilotless Aircraft
  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE