Accession Number:

ADA624033

Title:

A 6-Month Assessment of Sleep During Naval Deployment: A Case Study of a Commanding Officer

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Report Date:

2015-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

6.0

Abstract:

Sleep deprivation is known to be a common problem in the U.S. Navy and has been documented using wrist-worn actigraphy in various operational studies that typically span 2 to 4 wk in duration. However, sleep patterns over an extended period of time have not been objectively measured. This 6-mo study used actigraphy and the Fatigue Avoidance Scheduling Tool FAST to quantify the sleep patterns of a 39-year-old Commanding Officer CO of an Arleigh Burke Class destroyer while the ship was forward-deployed. On average, the CO received 5.2 h of sleep daily and averaged 6 h time in bed each day. The participant received more than 8 h of sleep for only 2 N3 of the study days for 17 N27 of the days, he received less than 4 h of daily sleep. For 15 of waking time, the CO had a predicted effectiveness of less than 70 on the FAST scale, equating toa blood alcohol equivalent of 0.08 --or legally drunk. The COs predicted effectiveness was below 65 approximately 10 of waking time. Results from this study are aligned with earlier research showing that crewmembers on U.S. Navy ships suffer from chronic sleep restriction. During a typical deployment, personnel accrue a considerable sleep debt even during normal operations. Should critical events with additional sleep restriction occur, the ship has limited reserve capacity, potentially placing her crew and their mission in grave jeopardy.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Human Factors Engineering and Man Machine Systems

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE