Accession Number:

ADA622224

Title:

Why Do Model Tropical Cyclones Intensify More Rapidly at Low Latitudes?

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

MUNICH UNIV (GERMANY F R) METEOROLOGISCHES INST

Report Date:

2015-05-01

Pagination or Media Count:

24.0

Abstract:

The authors examine the problem of why model tropical cyclones intensify more rapidly at low latitudes. The answer to this question touches on practically all facets of the dynamics and thermodynamics of tropical cyclones. The answer invokes the conventional spin-up mechanism, as articulated in classical and recent work together with a boundary layer feedback mechanism linking the strength of the boundary layer inflow to that of the diabatic forcing of the meridional overturning circulation. The specific role of the frictional boundary layer in regulating the dependence of the intensification rate on latitude is discussed. It is shown that, even if the tangential wind profile at the top of the boundary layer is held fixed, a simple, steady boundary layer model produces stronger low-level inflow and stronger, more confined ascent out of the boundary layer as the latitude is decreased, similar to the behavior found in a timedependent three-dimensional numerical model. In an azimuthally averaged view of the problem, the most prominent quantitative differences between the time-dependent simulations at 108 and 308N are the stronger boundary layer inflow and the stronger ascent of air exiting the boundary layer, together with the much larger diabatic heating rate and its radial gradient above the boundary layer at the lower latitude. These differences in conjunction with the convectively induced convergence of absolute angular momentum, greatly surpass the effects of rotational stiffness 201inertial stability202 and evaporative-wind feedback that have been proposed in some prior explanations.

Subject Categories:

  • Meteorology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE