Accession Number:

ADA617187

Title:

The U.S. Rebalance and Europe: Convergent Strategies Open Doors to Improved Cooperation

Descriptive Note:

Research paper

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV FORT MCNAIR DC INST FOR NATIONAL STRATEGIC STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2014-06-01

Pagination or Media Count:

39.0

Abstract:

The U.S. strategic rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region has captured the attention of our European allies and partners. When the strategy initially described as a pivot to Asia was articulated in late 2011 and early 2012, European reactions were diverse. Some governmental officials, nongovernmental experts, and media commentators voiced concern that the strategy signaled at best a diminishing U.S. interest in European security affairs, or at worst a deliberate U.S. policy of disengagement from Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East. European concerns regarding U.S. disengagement have dissipated but not entirely disappeared over the past 2 years. Still, U.S. readiness to lead politically and militarily in Europe for example, in response to the ongoing crisis involving Russia and Ukraine and adjoining regions remains under close scrutiny. Furthermore, while many Europeans agree in principle that renewed American focus on Asia-Pacific issues should encourage Europeans to assume a greater share of security-related responsibilities in their neighborhood, there is little evidence to date of a sea change in European attitudes toward defense spending and overseas military deployments. Meanwhile, many European governments are engaged in an Asia-Pacific rebalance of their own, albeit without using that term. They are working together, mainly under the auspices of the European Union EU, to set agreed international norms and standards, particularly in areas related to trade and investment. But they are also competing with each other and with the United States for economic markets, including defense-related sales. France and the United Kingdom are less reluctant than other Europeans to become involved in Asia-Pacific strategic affairs.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE