Accession Number:

ADA611932

Title:

Acoustic Clutter in Continental Shelf Environments

Descriptive Note:

Annual rept.

Corporate Author:

MASSACHUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE DEPT OF OCEAN ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2006-09-30

Pagination or Media Count:

5.0

Abstract:

Acoustic clutter is the primary problem encountered by active sonar systems operating in Continental Shelf environments. Clutter is defined as any returns from the environment that stand prominently above the diffuse and temporally decaying reverberation background and so can be confused with or camouflage returns from an intended target such as an underwater vehicle. Many environmental factors may contribute to acoustic clutter and adversely affect the performance of tactical Navy sonar by introducing false alarms in the system. In order to develop adaptive algorithms or technology to mitigate acoustic clutter, it is critical to identify, understand, and be able to accurately model the leading order physical mechanisms which cause clutter in existing sonar systems. The long-term goal of this program is to determine and understand the physical mechanisms that cause acoustic clutter in continental shelf environments and to use this knowledge to develop predictive tools to enhance the detection, localization and classification of underwater targets.

Subject Categories:

  • Physical and Dynamic Oceanography
  • Active and Passive Radar Detection and Equipment
  • Target Direction, Range and Position Finding

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE