Accession Number:

ADA611628

Title:

Rethinking Food: How United States Agriculture Production Affects Security Policy and Global Markets

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2014-06-13

Pagination or Media Count:

94.0

Abstract:

The United Nations projects the global population will reach over nine billion by 2050. While current projections indicate the world will produce enough food to feed everyone, unequal access to food, lack of infrastructure, and other factors will likely prevent an ideal distribution of food. The United States has been and remains a major exporter of several key commodities giving US production capacity great weight on world food export markets. This thesis looks from 1961 to the present at how the capability to be a net food exporter has affected foreign security policy. Using available theory and writings on using food as a means of national power, the study analyzes case studies where the United States used agriculture to secure political objectives by looking at background, actions, and effects of using food power. In addition to the case study material, this thesis analyzes several facets related to agricultural production such as domestic policy, World Trade Organization trade negotiations, and agricultural development. The intent is to find what elements of food exports have the most beneficial effects in order to re-evaluate the value of using US agricultural output as a means of national power.

Subject Categories:

  • Agricultural Economics
  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE