Accession Number:

ADA611086

Title:

Combat Airpower: Design Versus Use in a Limited War

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2014-06-13

Pagination or Media Count:

84.0

Abstract:

The period between World War II and the Korean War contained many changes in the design and capabilities of combat aircraft. The Second World War influenced these changes, but time and changes in the strategic environment prevented their completion prior to the end of the war. The services argued about these changes in the post-war period to demonstrate which was the more capable service of delivering the atomic bomb against the Soviet Union, and therefore garner more funding for their organization. On the eve of the Korean War, the Navy and Air Force believed they had the answer for defeating the Soviet threat and provided the best answer for delivering atomic weapons to maintain the security of the United States. The United States was not postured to intervene in the Korean War from the air effectively, and found the type of war they were fighting failed to meet the expectations of the interwar period. Close air support and interdiction were required to support the troops, but the operational control and some technical deficiencies hindered the effective use of the jet aircraft to support.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE