Accession Number:

ADA610988

Title:

Diplomats at War: A Critical Analysis of American and Confederate Diplomacy, 1861-1862

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2014-06-13

Pagination or Media Count:

119.0

Abstract:

The period from winter of 1861 until fall of 1862 proved pivotal in the Civil War. There were key victories and defeats on the battlefield, there was political change, there was debate over slavery, and, often overlooked, there was diplomatic maneuvering. Concerning diplomacy, the task for the Confederacy was to convince European powers that it was in the vital interest of those nations to intervene in the war. Intervention, by way of recognition, mediation, or temporary armistice, would be a major success for the Confederacy. If recognized as legitimate by other major powers, the Confederacy would gain the right to negotiate alliances, acquire loans to finance the war, and call on allies to challenge the legality of the blockade. The task for the United States proved more simplistic. Its task was to prevent European powers from recognizing the Confederacy. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the application of the diplomatic instrument of power by the United States and Confederate States from the winter of 1861 to the fall of 1862. Specific events this study evaluates during that time period include the Trent Affair, the Blockade, the Second Battle of Bull Run, and Battle of Antietam.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Humanities and History
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE