Accession Number:

ADA608391

Title:

Quantifying In Situ Contaminant Mobility in Marine Sediments

Descriptive Note:

Final rept.

Corporate Author:

SPACE AND NAVAL WARFARE SYSTEMS CENTER PACIFIC SAN DIEGO CA

Report Date:

2008-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

386.0

Abstract:

Contaminants enter shallow coastal waters from many sources, including ships, shoreside facilities, municipal outfalls, spills, and non point-source runoff. Sediments are typically considered a primary sink for these contaminants. Sediments in many bays, harbors and coastal waters used by DoD are contaminated with potentially harmful metal and organic compounds. The DoD is required by the Comprehensive Environmental Resource Conservation and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act of 1986 CERCLASARA, to assess and if necessary remove and remediate these sites and discharges in order to protect the public health or welfare of the environment. To determine whether contaminants are moving into, out of, or remaining immobilized within the sediments, a determination of contaminant flux must be made. Variations in sediment chemical and physical properties make it impossible to rely on bulk sediment contaminant concentrations alone to predict contaminant flux, bioavailability, and therefore toxicity. Diagenetic reactions in surface sediments control contaminant pore water gradients, and the direction and magnitude of these gradients control the diffusive flux across the sediment-water interface. These fluxes can be calculated from measurements of contaminant pore water gradients and sediment physical properties. However, in some coastal areas pore water gradients are very steep and therefore difficult to measure. In addition, flux calculations based on pore water gradients only provide the diffusive component of a contaminant flux. An additional concern in coastal areas is that biological irrigation by infauna and wave or current induced flushing may provide a larger component of flux through advection of water through the sediments. To avoid these problems, a direct measurement of contaminant flux in coastal areas is often the best method to assess contaminant mobility across the sediment-water interface.

Subject Categories:

  • Water Pollution and Control

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE