Accession Number:

ADA606100

Title:

Army Support to the United States Border Patrol in the 21st Century

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-05-19

Pagination or Media Count:

48.0

Abstract:

The United States Army faces significant budget cuts as the national debt rises and combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan end. Budgets cuts will decrease funding for training across the operational force as the Army moves to train for operations across the full spectrum of war. This monograph recommends that the Active Component AC of the Army maximize training opportunities by supporting the United States Border Patrol USBP at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels of border security. USBP works in a complex operating environment where the agency remains undermanned securing the border of the United States and Mexico and the border of the United States and Canada. The AC supports USBP at the tactical level by providing intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance ISR and infrastructure support by building fences and walls along the border with Mexico. At the operational level, AC officers assigned to Joint Task Force North support USBP around the country by planning joint federal law enforcement operations. At the strategic level the Command and General Staff College sends one AC officer per year to USBPs Strategic Plans-Policy and Analysis Division in Washington D.C. to help in a myriad of tasks pertaining to national policy and planning. Sustained support to USBP by the AC gives commanders opportunities to become more proficient in Core Mission Essential Tasks and Mission Essential Tasks using joint dollars. In 2005, a Stryker reconnaissance squadron supported USBP for 30 days prior to training at the Joint Readiness Training Center before the units deployment to Iraq. This invaluable training prepared the squadron for combat operations and increased USBP illegal immigrant interdictions near the Deming Station in Deming, New Mexico. If AC battalions fail to maximize training opportunities in complex environments on the borders of the United States, then we limit unique soldier and leader experience as operations in Iraq and Afghanistan end.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Civil Defense

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE