Accession Number:

ADA605934

Title:

Multidimensional Models Used in Rivers and Streams

Descriptive Note:

Technical note

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2001-09-01

Pagination or Media Count:

18.0

Abstract:

The purpose of this Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note is to introduce state-of-the-art applications of multidimensional models with sediment transport capabilities to solve sedimentation problems in rivers and streams. The term multidimensional encompasses both two- and three-dimensional models. Models of this type typically include both hydrodynamics and some degree of sediment transport capabilities. Two modeling applications are presented using models with advanced sediment transport capabilities a the lower Apalachicola River using the three-dimensional model CH3D-SED, and b the Red River Waterway at the John H. Overton Lock and Dam JHO downstream approach channel using the model RMA2-SED2D. Dredged material disposal that is sometimes used on inland waterways involves the placement of the dredged material along the banks of the waterway. During high-water periods, these sediments are then either swept back into the stream or mechanically pushed into the waterway. This type of dredged material disposal is often referred to as mechanical redistribution. The assumption in this operation is that the currents generated by the high-water flows will sweep the previously dredged sediment downstream of the dredged channel. Numerical prediction tools can be used to assess if the sediments moving from the riverbank back into the waterway are indeed transported away from the dredging site or redeposited within the dredging site. To provide such a prediction tool, a three-dimensional model called CH3D-SED was used for simulating the movement of dredged material disposal on riverbanks and the subsequent fate of that material. A three-dimensional modeling approach was required due to the complex secondary current patterns that typically exist in river bendways.

Subject Categories:

  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
  • Numerical Mathematics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE