Accession Number:

ADA604708

Title:

Verification of a Non-Hydrostatic Dynamical Core Using Horizontally Spectral Element Vertically Finite Difference Method: 2D Aspects

Descriptive Note:

Journal article preprint

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Report Date:

2014-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

43.0

Abstract:

The non-hydrostatic NH compressible Euler equations of dry atmosphere are solved in a simplified two dimensional 2D slice X-Z framework employing a spectral element method SEM for the horizontal discretization and a finite difference method FDM for the vertical discretization. The SEM uses high-order nodal basis functions associated with Lagrange polynomials based on Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre GLL quadrature points. The FDM employs a third-order upwind biased scheme for the vertical flux terms and a centered finite difference scheme for the vertical derivative terms and quadrature. The Euler equations used here are in a flux form based on the hydrostatic pressure vertical coordinate, which are the same as those used in the Weather Research and Forecasting WRF model, but a hybrid sigma-pressure vertical coordinate is implemented in this model. We verified the model by conducting widely used standard benchmark tests the inertia-gravity wave, rising thermal bubble, density current wave, and linear hydrostatic mountain wave. The numerical results demonstrate that the horizontally spectral element vertically finite difference model is accurate and robust. By using the 2D slice model, we effectively show that the combined spatial discretization method of the spectral element and finite difference method in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, offers a viable method for the development of a NH dynamical core. The present core provides a practical framework for further development of three-dimensional 3D non-hydrostatic compressible atmospheric models.

Subject Categories:

  • Atmospheric Sciences
  • Theoretical Mathematics
  • Operations Research
  • Fluid Mechanics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE