Accession Number:

ADA604300

Title:

Changing the Army's Weapon Training Strategies to Meet Operational Requirements More Efficiently and Effectively

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

RAND ARROYO CENTER SANTA MONICA CA

Report Date:

2014-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

104.0

Abstract:

The ability of soldiers and crews to engage the enemy successfully has been fundamental to the operational success of the U.S. Army since its founding and remains so today. As a result, the Army devotes considerable resources and effort to developing and maintaining weapon-system proficiency. In 2010, over a billion dollars were spent to buy training ammunition, and many dollars were spent maintaining and providing the training aids, devices, simulators, simulations, ranges, and targetry TADSS-RT that support weapon-system training.1 Additionally, units have traditionally devoted considerable time to weapon-system proficiency. In 2001 and 2002, combat brigades devoted about 45 days half of their annual field training days to live- and dry-fire exercises, and they spent additional time on preliminary weapon-system training in garrison.2 Since 2002, the Army has broadened its operational focus and has implemented a new Army Force Generation ARFORGEN approach to unit readiness. These shifts have caused the Army to consider options for achieving better alignment among the weapon training strategies outlined in DA Pamphlet 350-38, Standards in Training Commission STRAC broadened operational requirements and ARFORGEN readiness strategies. It is also examining options for more effectively using weapon-system simulators both to enhance training and use scarce training resources more efficiently.3

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE