Accession Number:

ADA599080

Title:

Comparison of Injury Incidence Between the T-11 Advanced Tactical Parachute System and the T-10D Parachute, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, June 2010-November 2013

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. Jun 2010-Nov 2013

Corporate Author:

ARMY PUBLIC HEALTH COMMAND ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD

Report Date:

2014-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

49.0

Abstract:

This report compares injury rates between the older T-10D parachute and the newer T-11 parachute. From June 2010 to November 2013 3.5 years data were systematically collected on jump operations performed by the 82nd Airborne Division, XVIII Airborne Corps, and 18th Air Support Operations Group using these parachutes. Data on injured jumpers were collected on the drop zone and followed up with medical records. Operational data were collected from flight manifests and flash reports and included parachute type, time of day, type of jump administrativenon-tactical or combat loaded, aircraft, aircraft exit door right, left, tailgate, jump order order in which the Soldiers exited the aircraft, Soldier s rank, drop zone, and entanglements. Temperature, humidity, heat index, and wind speed were obtained on the drop zone using a Kestrel Model 4500 pocket weather tracker. There was a total of 131,747 jumps resulting in 1,101 injured Soldiers for a crude incidence of 8.4 injuries1,000 jumps. Most injuries 88 with a known injury mechanism were associated with ground impact. In univariate analysis, risk of injury with the T-10D was 9.11,000 jumps, and that with the T-11 was 5.21,000 jumps odds ratio T-10DT-111.72, 95 confidence interval 95CI1.45-2.08, p0.01. Other factors that independently increased injury risk included night jumps, combat loads, higher wind speeds, higher temperatures, certain aircraft, and entanglements. After controlling for these factors in a multivariate analysis, injury risk was still higher for the T-10D parachute when compared to the T-11 odds ratio T-10DT-111.56, 95CI1.28-1.89, p0.01. For virtually all strata of the independent risk factors, the T-11 had a lower injury rate than the T-10.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Aircraft Operations
  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE