Accession Number:

ADA595630

Title:

Systemic Stress: The Army Lifestyle through the Social Readjustment Scale Lens

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLLEGE FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2013-05-22

Pagination or Media Count:

81.0

Abstract:

The Army lifestyle is often viewed as inherently stressful. The result of that stress is, at times, approached with reactionary measures instead of a proactive stance. This may be due to the inability of commanders to metrically evaluate their soldiers conditions. This study utilizes the Holmes and Rahe Social Readjustment Scale to provide that metric. Additionally, it serves as a basis for followup studies to determine how that metric can be incorporated into Army units reporting and readiness. Our primary research question is as follows Does the Army lifestyle generate stressors that can be accurately measured and predicted To answer this question, it is first necessary to answer several secondary questions. What are the common stressors that are present in soldiers lives We must examine the events that face soldiers and determine which of these events qualify as stressors. Are these stressors unique to the Army lifestyle This is an important step in the process. We must determine the difference between the stressors that are part of the Army system and those that are purely incidental to the organization. Do scales or tools exist that have the ability to measure or score these stressors Identifying the stressors is not enough. We also must identify a metric with which they can be assessed. If we are able to identify such tools, do these tools have predictive validity The tools can be a reliable metric, but if they lack predictability they are only valid as a reporting tool. The predictability of the tool is the key to giving the commander the ability to project his units readiness. Finally, if the scales exist and are valid, what is their relevance Do their measurements correlate to factors that impact military readiness

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE