Accession Number:

ADA595560

Title:

Elements of Success: How Type of Secondary Education Credential Helps Predict Enlistee Attrition

Descriptive Note:

Research rept.

Corporate Author:

RAND NATIONAL DEFENSE RESEARCH INST SANTA MONICA CA

Report Date:

2014-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

66.0

Abstract:

Aptitude for successful military service in the enlisted ranks includes the ability to succeed in at least one of many military occupational specialties, career fields, or ratings, and the ability to adapt to and thrive in a military lifestyle of good order and discipline. The Department of Defense screens military applicants for these qualities using the Armed Forces Qualification Test from the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery, physical and moral standards, and educational credentials. Historically, educational credentials have served as a proxy for the ability to adapt to a military lifestyle. Evidence that supports this use is the stark difference in completion rates for the initial term of service between recruits who hold traditional high school diplomas and those who hold General Educational Development certificates. However, the last few decades have witnessed an explosion of ways to earn education credentials, including homeschooling and distance learning. Therefore, at this juncture, it is important to consider whether these particular education credentials specifically those for homeschool and distance learning remain suitable proxies for predicting first-term attrition. We asked the following narrowly focused research question to determine whether existing attrition data support the current policy regarding distance learning and homeschool credentials Are applicants with less than 50 on the AFQT who have distance learning or homeschool credentials more likely to attrit within the first three years than those with high school diplomas all else being equal. The results should be of interest to Congress and Department of Defense policymakers who set policies for entrance into enlisted military service, as well as to the military services recruiting services.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Psychology
  • Personnel Management and Labor Relations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE