Accession Number:

ADA592490

Title:

Mine and Explosive Ordnance Information Coordination Center Operations in Iraq

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

ARMY ENGINEER SCHOOL FORT LEONARD WOOD MO

Report Date:

2004-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

4.0

Abstract:

Since Desert Storm in 1991, U.S. forces have operated in numerous foreign areas to include Kuwait, Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq littered with land mines and the explosive devices of war. Each of these countries presented a unique set of explosive hazards, enemy activities, environmental conditions, and operational requirements for our soldiers. In each case, U.S. forces participated as part of the joint and multinational coalition community, often including military and nongovernmental organizations. Historically, each area of operations might have had an ad hoc Mine Information Coordination Cell MICC to track explosive hazards, coordinate safe military movement in mined areas, support force protection through hazard awareness training, and occasionally provide oversight of indigenous demining activities. If humanitarian demining operations were active in the region, the United Nations often established a National Mine Action Authority NMAA to coordinate Mine Action Center MAC operations in theater. Unfortunately, the U.S. Army does not have procedures or a doctrinal organization to conduct MICC operations, which often results in regional improvisation and diversity among units. Minefields and hazards might be tracked with Excel spreadsheets, FoxBASE , Access database, or Microsoft PowerPoint slides and a grease pencil. Often, relations between military MICCs and humanitarian demining activities were hostile, or at least strained. Coordination between coalition partners and U.S. ground forces had no common baseline for information dissemination and cooperation.

Subject Categories:

  • Information Science
  • Ammunition and Explosives

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE