Accession Number:

ADA592231

Title:

Japan-Taiwan Relations: A Case of Tempered Optimism

Descriptive Note:

Special assessment rept.

Corporate Author:

ASIA-PACIFIC CENTER FOR SECURITY STUDIES HONOLULU HI

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Japan-Taiwan relations have grown close over the past fifteen years due to the end of the Cold War, the emergence of Chinese economic and military power, cultural and political changes in Taiwan and the rise of a new generation of politicians in Japan. The Chen Shui-bian administration has attempted to capitalize on this trend by enhancing political, economic, and security ties with Japan. Japan has taken small steps to increase political contacts and security dialogue, but remains cool to a Free Trade Area FTA proposal by Taiwan. Despite signs of strengthening ties with Taiwan, Japans formal One China policy remains unchanged. Japan is wary of Taiwan moving toward independence and remains sensitive to Chinese criticism of its involvement with Taiwan. A territorial dispute over the SenkakuDiaoyutai islands that Japan shares with both Taiwan and the People s Republic of China PRC also inclines Japan to favor the status quo. Improved Japan-Taiwan ties will benefit United States security planning under the Taiwan Relations Act, as trilateral coordination among the three countries will be essential in the case of a contingency in the area. Japan has taken a somewhat more proactive approach to its relationship with Taiwan in recent years, but this has occurred primarily within the context of improving policy coordination with the United States.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE