Accession Number:

ADA585732

Title:

Literature Review on Mental Models and Linear Separability

Descriptive Note:

Research rept.

Corporate Author:

DEFENCE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION EDINBURGH (AUSTRALIA) LAND OPERATIONS DIV

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2013-04-01

Pagination or Media Count:

33.0

Abstract:

The mental models theory suggests that people make reasoning errors because they construct partial -- and inaccurate -- mental models. It predicts that when people are required to consider false information, they are more prone to making errors than when they are only required to consider true information. Findings consistent with this theory have been demonstrated across a number of studies, particularly the work of Johnson-Laird. However, researchers at DSTO suggested that these findings are better explained by a linear separability effect. That is, problems are easier to solve when they are linearly separable than when they are nonlinearly separable. The simplicity and precision with which correct and incorrect answers can be separated determines the extent to which they will be solved correctly. This literature review examines research on mental models and linear separability published between 2000 and 2012, to establish if this explanation has been proposed by other researchers. Results indicate that no other researchers have proposed this, or similar, explanations, hence the linear separability hypothesis has the potential to make a novel contribution to the literature.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE