Accession Number:

ADA585135

Title:

Globalization of S&T: Key Challenges Facing DOD

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV FORT MCNAIR DC CENTER FOR TECHNOLOGY AND NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-02-01

Pagination or Media Count:

37.0

Abstract:

In the second half of the 20th century, the United States enjoyed stature and prosperity at levels seldom achieved in recorded history. The country s status included predominance in most fields of science and technology ST, as well as a phenomenal breadth and pace of innovation. We are now experiencing a global shift to a more level playing field among nations demographics, economics, and political forces are the driving forces behind this shift. The impact of this shift on U.S. ST will be significant. By the middle of the 21st century, it is likely that a number of nations will be similarly prosperous and technologically productive. No single nation or group will dominate as the United States did in the latter half of the 1900s. The U.S. share of the global ST enterprise will decrease, and only a small fraction of U.S. scientists and engineers SE will work on national security problems. This change poses challenges to the roles and conduct of Department of Defense DOD ST. In particular, DOD s ability to maintain an authoritative awareness of ST developments around the world will become increasingly problematic. Most attempts to quantify these challenges utilize simple linear or exponential extrapolations. Although such approaches are helpful for short-term predictions, they tend to produce unrealistically pessimistic predictions for the timescales considered in this paper. The present work establishes an empirical relationship between an economy s gross domestic product GDP per capita and its ability to generate ST knowledge. This paper then employs the results of a full economic analysis for the period 2005 2050 to estimate the ST knowledge production for each of the world s 17 largest economies. The estimate indicates that U.S. share of ST productivity will decline from about 26 percent in 2005 to 18 percent in 2050.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Information Science
  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Government and Political Science
  • Test Facilities, Equipment and Methods

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE