Accession Number:

ADA581419

Title:

Congressional Authority to Limit Military Operations

Descriptive Note:

Congressional rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Report Date:

2013-02-19

Pagination or Media Count:

43.0

Abstract:

Controversy continues over the appropriate role that Congress should play in regulating U.S. military operations against foreign entities. U.S. action against Libya reignited consideration of long-standing questions concerning the President s constitutional authority to use military force without congressional authorization, as well as congressional authority to regulate or limit the use of such force. There may be a renewed focus in the 113th Congress on whether or to what extent Congress has the constitutional authority to legislate limits on the President s authority to conduct military operations in Afghanistan, Yemen, Somalia, or other locations. This report begins by discussing constitutional provisions allocating war powers between Congress and the President, and presenting a historical overview of relevant court cases. It considers Congress s constitutional authority to end a military conflict via legislative action the implications that the War Powers Resolution or the repeal of prior military authorization may have upon the continued use of military force and other considerations which may inform congressional decisions to limit the use of military force via statutory command or through funding limitations. The report discusses Congress s ability to limit funding for U.S. participation in hostilities, examining relevant court cases and prior measures taken by Congress to restrict military operations, as well as possible alternative avenues to fund these activities in the event that appropriations are cut. The report then provides historical examples of measures that restrict the use of particular personnel, and concludes with a brief analysis of arguments that might be brought to bear on the question of Congress s authority to limit the availability of troops to serve in ongoing military operations. Although not beyond debate, such limitations appear to be within Congress s authority to allocate resources for military operations.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE