Accession Number:

ADA576413

Title:

Coupled BOUSS-2D and CMS-Wave Modeling Approach for Harbor Projects

Descriptive Note:

Technical note

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

11.0

Abstract:

This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note CHETN describes the coupled application of two advanced coastal wave models, BOUSS-2D and CMS-Wave, for harbor applications. The two models have different computational features and capabilities that are complementary and the combined usage of these models is advantageous for applications to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers USACE navigation projects. The coupling of two models is illustrated in this Technical Note for two harbors. Ports and harbors include entrance channels, approach channels, harbor interiors, turning basins, infrastructure, berths, docks and mooring areas that allow ships to access basins and surrounding supporting facilities. Harbors can be located either on the coast or in inland water bodies such as in the Great Lakes or along rivers and inter-coastal waterways. Waves reaching ports and harbors can experience strong shoaling, refraction, diffraction and reflection caused by jetties and breakwaters that protect navigation channels and inlets. Large coastal breakwaters are sometimes constructed outside harbors and ports, intended to block high-energy waves. Waves propagating through navigation channels and inlets that penetrate into the ship basins and marinas can cause dangerous surges seiching and hazardous berthing and mooring conditions. Navigation and harbor projects often deal with widening, deepening and channel sedimentation issues, as well as evaluation of structural alternatives and port expansion scenarios. Recent developments in numerical wave and hydrodynamic modeling have greatly aided these efforts. For harbors and ports, efficient and accurate wave modeling is paramount because waves at entrance channels, inlets, harbors and structures affect navigation safety, shoaling of channels and siltation of harbors, stability of jetties and breakwaters, and efficiency of port operations.

Subject Categories:

  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology
  • Computer Programming and Software

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE