Accession Number:

ADA574437

Title:

Southwest Hispanic Community -- The Absence of Homeland Security Threats

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

113.0

Abstract:

Threats of terrorism and insurgency along the Southwest border are typically supported by anecdotal evidence rather than objective assessments of such threats, which limits governments ability to appropriately address issues related to homeland security, such as immigration enforcement and border security. This thesis provides an objective assessment of the potential for terrorist and insurgent threats to emanate from within the Southwest Hispanic Community by reviewing the status of and pressures upon the community using Social Identity Theory and Resource Mobilization Theory. The results indicate that Hispanics in the Southwest typically experience greater disparities in sociocultural, economic, and political conditions than non-Hispanics. External and internal pressures, represented by immigration policies and mandates for language usage, also have a greater impact upon the Hispanic community compared to non-Hispanic communities. Social Identity Theory provides a means for understanding why social movements form, while Resource Mobilization Theory provides insight into how movements are created. The potential for radicalization also is examined to determine whether violent movements can develop from otherwise nonviolent movements or communities. Despite the disparities and significant pressures they have to withstand, the thesis concludes that there are no current threats of terrorism or insurgency within the Southwest Hispanic Community. The adoption of omnicultural policies can further reduce the potential for such threats to surface.

Subject Categories:

  • Sociology and Law
  • Geography
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE