Accession Number:

ADA573813

Title:

The Post-9/11 European Union Counterterrorism Response: Legal-Institutional Framework

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA DEPT OF NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

189.0

Abstract:

This thesis explores the European Unions EU legal-institutional response to international terrorism since 911. Using an analytical approach, the thesis connects counterterrorism measures with outcomes to determine whether the counterterrorism framework in place in Europe is successful today. Following an introductory chapter, Chapter 2 presents a historical overview of the EUs response to terrorism following the 911 attack, the Madrid bombings, and the London bombings. This chapter also describes the main European institutions related to EU counterterrorism i.e., Europol, Eurojust, the EU Counterterrorism Coordinator, and the EU Joint Situation Center. Chapter 3 provides a qualitative analysis of several of the most influential and controversial European counterterrorism measures, with a focus on solutions for the security-versus-human-rights dilemma and challenges in implementation. This chapter examines European arrest warrants, money laundering, terrorist financing, targeted United Nations sanctions, and counterterrorism cooperation with the United States. Chapter 4 assesses the effectiveness of the EU counterterrorism approach by examining trends in terrorist activities from 2006 to 2011 arrested, prosecuted, and convicted terrorists in the EU from 2006 to 2011 and public fear of terrorism based on public opinion polls. The assessment shows that the implementation of many counterterrorism measures corresponds to positive trends in terrorist activities, arrests, and convictions. Also, European counterterrorism initiatives may be linked to a lessening of European citizens fears of terrorism and to stable public support for European counterterrorism efforts. Chapter 5 presents an overview of EU counterterrorism costs since 911. The thesis concludes that the EU counterterrorism legal-institutional framework accommodates human rights at the very high level that European citizens expect, while successfully executing effective counterterrorism measures.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Sociology and Law
  • Unconventional Warfare

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE