Accession Number:

ADA571746

Title:

Sediment Management at the Watershed Level

Descriptive Note:

Technical note

Corporate Author:

ENGINEER RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER VICKSBURG MS COASTAL AND HYDRAULICS LAB

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

Channel instability is a serious problem throughout the United States U.S.. The magnitude of this problem is illustrated in the Corps of Engineers final report to Congress for the Streambank Erosion Control Evaluation and Demonstration Program, which reported that the U.S. contains over one-half million 574,000 miles of eroding bank lines USACE 1981. Dams, levees, diversion structures, and the straightening, widening, deepening, and clearing of channel systems are common methods used to provide flood control, navigation, water supply, sediment management, irrigation, recreation, and hydropower. The cumulative impacts of these types of activities, combined with watershed changes such as de-forestation and urbanization, have significantly disrupted the dynamic equilibrium of stream systems and the related ecosystems. The sediments generated by these disturbances clog flood-control channels, destroy wetlands and lakes, adversely impact fish and wildlife habitats, degrade the water quality of streams, adversely impact infrastructure, and initiate accelerated stream instabilities. The accelerated sediment yields associated with these watershed instabilities are particularly a problem with respect to sedimentation in reservoirs.

Subject Categories:

  • Hydrology, Limnology and Potamology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE