Accession Number:

ADA568686

Title:

SOLLIMS Sampler: Targeting Peace & Stability Operations Lessons & Best Practices. Volume 3, Issue 3

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

ARMY WAR COLLEGE CARLISLE BARRACKS PA ARMY PEACEKEEPING AND STABILITY OPERATIONS INSTITUTE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-07-01

Pagination or Media Count:

41.0

Abstract:

Reconciliation or the process of developing a mutual conciliatory accommodation between antagonistic or formerly antagonistic persons or groups is a strategic imperative. In order for peacekeeping and stability operations to have a long-term impact, groups involved in past violence must reconcile. Deep-seated grievances may linger between the government and certain groups of citizens, or between religious groups, ethnic groups, geographic communities, or socio-economic classes. Often, the involved partiesfactions can be grouped into many of the aforementioned categories. No matter the categories, achieving reconciliation has proven to be complex business. Post-conflict reconciliation is particularly challenging. Countries with a history of conflict have a predisposition to return to violence, often due to unchanged circumstances and loyalties of former militants. In order to integrate former militants back into civil society, some governments have adopted policies that provide ex-combatants with training and employment opportunities often under Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration DDR programs. Detractors claim that such policies reward former criminals, while proponents argue that such policies provide incentives for ex-combatants to not restart a conflict.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE