Accession Number:

ADA563126

Title:

Adaptations to Curriculum at the Quartermaster School Officer Candidate Course during World War II

Descriptive Note:

Master's thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2012-06-08

Pagination or Media Count:

107.0

Abstract:

The United States Army faced an officer shortage while mobilizing before World War II. General George C. Marshall pushed for the creation of Officer Candidate Schools OCS as a method to bridge the officer personnel gap. OCS generated the largest numbers of officers during World War II. The Quartermaster School faced the same dilemma as all the other branch schools. It used a peacetime curriculum when establishing the training program for their officer candidate course. While a good effort, the faculty could not have correctly anticipated the specific training requirements of junior officers in World War II. The performance of junior officers was a point of consistent inquiry at The Quartermaster School and throughout the Army Leadership. They routinely reviewed both the content of their courses and the efficacy of their product. This inquisitive culture resulted in numerous adaptations to the overall program. This thesis argues that The Quartermaster School actively sought to adjust its curriculum during World War II in response to reports from combat theaters and realized need for change.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE