Accession Number:

ADA558331

Title:

Autophagy-Mediated Defense Response of Mouse Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) to Challenge with Escherichia coli

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

UNIFORMED SERVICES UNIV OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES BETHESDA MD

Report Date:

2012-03-01

Pagination or Media Count:

23.0

Abstract:

Symbiotic microorganisms are spatially separated from their animal host, e.g., in the intestine and skin, in a manner enabling nutrient metabolism as well as evolutionary development of protective physiologic features in the host such as innate and adaptive immunity, immune tolerance, and function of tissue barriers . The major interface barrier between the microbiota and host tissue is constituted by epithelium reticuloendothelial tissue, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue MALT . Traumatic damage to skin and the internal epithelium in soft tissues can cause infections that account for 7 to 10 of hospitalizations in the United States 4. Moreover, wound infections and sepsis are an increasing cause of death in severely ill patients, especially those with immunosupression due to exposure to cytotoxic agents and chronic inflammation 4. It is well accepted that breakdown of the host-bacterial symbiotic homeostasis and associated infections are the major consequences of impairment of the first line of antimicrobial defense barriers such as the mucosal layers, MALT and reticuloendothelium. Under these impairment conditions of particular interest then is the role of sub-mucosal structures, such as connective tissue stroma, in the innate defense compensatory responses to infections. The mesenchymal connective tissue of different origins is a major source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells i.e., colony-forming-unit fibroblasts. Recent discovery of immunomodulatory function of mesenchymal stromal cells MSCs suggests that they are essential constituents that control inflammatory responses.

Subject Categories:

  • Medicine and Medical Research

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE