Accession Number:

ADA558181

Title:

BG J. Franklin Bell and the Practice of Operational Art in the Philippines, 1901-1902

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-12-01

Pagination or Media Count:

59.0

Abstract:

U.S. Army commanders seek to balance the requirements to conduct offensive, defensive, and stability operations simultaneously. Within this framework, commanders also have had to balance the conduct of traditional military actions and nonmilitary activities. To do all this effectively, commanders employ operational art. The forthcoming Army Doctrinal Publication, Unified Land Operations presents the principle that operational art is the connection between strategic objectives and tactical actions, and provides a common construct for organizing military operations. This manual defines operational art as the pursuit of strategic objectives, in whole or in part, through the arrangement of tactical actions in time, space, and purpose. While the Army did not introduce the concept of operational art into its doctrine until 1986, commanders had previously applied it. The United States war in the Philippines from 1899-1902 provides one example of a conflict in which commanders had to conduct combat and stability operations simultaneously. The campaign of Brigadier General J. Franklin Bell is an example of how a commander employed operational art to do so. General Bells campaign in the Batangas Province demonstrates how a commander employed operational art to arrange traditional military and nonmilitary tactical actions in pursuit of strategic objectives.

Subject Categories:

  • Humanities and History
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE