Accession Number:

ADA555152

Title:

P11, a Biomarker for Memory Retrieval: A Possible Role in Traumatic Stress

Descriptive Note:

Final rept. 15 Sep 2008-14 Sep 2011

Corporate Author:

HENRY M JACKSON FOUNDATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MILITARY MEDICINE ROCKVILLE MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-10-01

Pagination or Media Count:

10.0

Abstract:

This is our annual report for the project P11, A Biomarker for Memory Retrieval A Possible Role in Traumatic Stress. We carried out all of the experiments based on the proposed research design. Due to all experiment dependent on the p11 knockout mice and the postponed scheduled p11 knockout mice development, we have tested memory retrieval performance with wild type mice. Fortunately, the detailed plan of p11 knockout mice development, such genotyping and delivery schedule has been approved by both our institution and The Jackson Laboratory JAX. Currently, the p11 knockout mice have been breeding now at JAX. As we proposed, we will use the p11 knockout mice to conduct two critical experiments to determine the effects of footshock on water-maze spatial task performance and to examine the role of p11 in memory retrieval performance in these mice. Our data from wild type of mice is the same as pervious reported 1 Footshock and corticosterone significantly decreased the time spent on target and produced no effect on time spent on opposite, indicating a significant impaired performance in the water-maze spatial task in stressed mice compared to control in p11 wild type. 2 Stress resulted in p11 protein up-regulation, which as determined by Western Blot in the hippocampus, cortex and amygdala of wild type mice. 3 Stress and corticosterone resulted in p11 mRNA up-regulation, which as determined by real time PCR in the hippocampus, a brain region associated with memory function. The ongoing final experiment with p11 knockout mice will allow us to accomplish all of our proposed specific aims.

Subject Categories:

  • Anatomy and Physiology
  • Medicine and Medical Research
  • Stress Physiology

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE