Accession Number:

ADA547672

Title:

Should Security Researchers Experiment More and Draw More Inferences?

Descriptive Note:

Corporate Author:

CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIV PITTSBURGH PA DEPT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Two methodological practices are well established in other scientific disciplines yet remain rare in computer-security research comparative experiments and statistical inferences. Comparative experiments offer the only way to control factors that might vary from one study to the next. Statistical inferences enable a researcher to draw general conclusions from empirical results. Despite their widespread use in other sciences, these practices are haphazardly used in security research. Choosing keystroke dynamics as an example to study, we survey the literature. Of 80 papers wherein these practices would be appropriate, only 43 53.75 performed comparative experiments, and only 6 7.5 drew statistical inferences. In disciplines such as medicine, comparative experiments and statistical inferences save lives and cut costs. Rigorous methodological standards are required. We see no reason why security research, another discipline where the stakes are critically high, cannot or should not adopt these practices as well. Failure to take a more scientific approach to security research stalls progress and leaves us vulnerable.

Subject Categories:

  • Computer Systems Management and Standards

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE