Accession Number:

ADA545590

Title:

Inverting the Army Intelligence Pyramid

Descriptive Note:

Monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-05-19

Pagination or Media Count:

69.0

Abstract:

Lessons learned from operations in Afghanistan and Iraq over the past ten years indicate that the Army is fighting in an environment that requires a change in how organizations gather, analyze, synthesize, and produce intelligence. Top-down intelligence no longer drives todays operations. Instead, current operations produce numerous lower-level information and intelligence reports that higher headquarters must gather, analyze, and synthesize. The sheer volume of these reports and the depth and breadth of information they provide often exceed the capacity of the intelligence organizations at the various headquarters echelons -- particularly those within the brigade combat team BCT.The particularly high demand for intelligence in todays operational environment, coupled with the need for operational integration of tactical units, leads to the critical question does the U.S. Army require intelligence support teams at the company-level in all BCTs The methodology consists of a detailed description, analysis, and synthesis of current data collected on intelligence needs and organizational responses to these needs at the company-level throughout the U.S. Army. This research includes case study analysis comparing select brigade combat teams that employed company-level intelligence support teams CoISTs with those that did not. A review of historical literature on Army operations reveals a pattern of success among units who had a section of three to eight personnel within the company dedicated exclusively to intelligence analysis. While this research does not indicate a fundamental change in the nature of war, it does highlight the unique requirements for intelligence collection and analysis in todays wars. In particular, close interaction between Army units and local populations has led to the generation of vast amounts of information that platoons and comp

Subject Categories:

  • Military Intelligence
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE