Accession Number:

ADA543667

Title:

How Is Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan Affecting U.S. Service Members and Their Families? An Overview of Early Rand Research on the Topic

Descriptive Note:

Occasional paper

Corporate Author:

RAND NATIONAL DEFENSE RESEARCH INST SANTA MONICA CA

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

63.0

Abstract:

The extended wars in Iraq and Afghanistan over the past decade have affected the lives of approximately two million U.S. service members and their families in many different ways. In an all-volunteer force, the nature of those effects warrants proper attention, because the well-being of troops and the people close to them is a central concern. On one side, it affects military readiness and the ability of the U.S. armed forces to carry out their mission. On the other, it is something the nation has committed itself to in appreciation of the sacrifices made by military families. Effective policies to facilitate the well-being of this community require a comprehensive understanding of the myriad issues and consequences that service members and their families may face due to the stress of deployment. Yet for much of the 2000s, such understanding was largely lacking. Recognizing the need for analysis, around 2005, the RAND Corporation launched a program of research designed to investigate this theme and, where possible, offer policymakers informed recommendations. This occasional paper introduces this body of workongoing todayby presenting an overview of six of the earliest RAND studies on various aspects of the theme. It calls attention to the pressing policy questions, summarizes the key findings and policy implications, and, where applicable, lays out recommendations. The research described in this paper will be of interest to policymakers, analysts, staff of the U.S. Department of Defense, members of the military community, the service providers who work with and for them, and readers generally concerned with how current military operations are affecting U.S. troops and their families.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE