Accession Number:

ADA543589

Title:

The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Global War on Terror Operations Since 9/11

Descriptive Note:

Congressional research rept.

Corporate Author:

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS WASHINGTON DC CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2011-03-29

Pagination or Media Count:

60.0

Abstract:

With enactment of the sixth FY2011 Continuing Resolution through March 18, 2011, H.J.Res. 48P.L. 112-6 Congress has approved a total of 1.283 trillion for military operations, base security, reconstruction, foreign aid, embassy costs, and veterans health care for the three operations initiated since the 911 attacks Operation Enduring Freedom OEF Afghanistan and other counter terror operations Operation Noble Eagle ONE, providing enhanced security at military bases and Operation Iraqi Freedom OIF. This estimate assumes that the current CR level continues through the rest of the year and that agencies allocate reductions proportionately. Of this 1.283 trillion total, CRS estimates that Iraq will receive about 806 billion 63, OEF 444 billion 35 and enhanced base security about 29 billion 2, with about 5 billion that CRS cannot allocate 12. About 94 of the funds are for DOD, 5 for foreign aid programs and diplomatic operations, and 1 for medical care for veterans. Between FY2009 and FY2010, average monthly DOD spending for Afghanistan grew from 4.4 billion to 6.7 billion a month, a 50 increase while average troop strength almost doubled from 44,000 to 84,000 as part of the troop surge announced by the President last year. Troop strength in Afghanistan is expected to average 102,000 in FY2011. DODs plans call for troop levels to fall by less than 4,000 in FY2012 unless the President decides otherwise as part of his decision to begin transition to Afghan security lead in early 2011. . . to a a responsible, conditions-based U.S. troop reduction in July 2011. At the same time, the President announced a long-term U.S. commitment to a NATO summit goal of a path to complete transition by the end of 2014. It is currently unclear how quickly or slowly troop levels will fall this summer or in later years to meet these goals.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE