Accession Number:

ADA535203

Title:

Sleep Patterns Before, During, and After Deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL HEALTH RESEARCH CENTER SAN DIEGO CA DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CENTER FOR DEPLOYMENT HEALTHE RESEARCH

Report Date:

2010-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

According to a 2008 report from the National Sleep Foundation, Americans are working more and sleeping less, with the average work day lasting 9 hours 28 minutes and time in bed only 6 hours 55 minutes. The US military is at particularly high risk for sleep disturbances due to hazardous working conditions, inconsistent work hours, harsh environments, routine exposure to loud noises, and crowded sleeping spaces. Exposures to these adverse working conditions are often intensified during deployments, including the current increased operational tempo, with lengthy and frequent deployments, as well as demanding training exercises. Deployment-related factors may lead to sleep complaints, including circadian desynchronosis, total or partial sleep deprivation, lengthy sleep latency, and wakening after sleep onset that may, in turn, exacerbate mental and physical health symptoms following deployment.

Subject Categories:

  • Psychology
  • Stress Physiology
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE