Accession Number:

ADA533780

Title:

A Galerkin Approach to Define Measured Terrain Surfaces with Analytic Basis Vectors to Produce a Compact Representation

Descriptive Note:

Doctoral thesis

Corporate Author:

ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER WARREN MI

Report Date:

2010-11-01

Pagination or Media Count:

229.0

Abstract:

The concept of simulation-based engineering has been embraced by virtually every research and industry sector Sinha, Liang et al. 2001 Mocko and Fenves 2003. Engineering and science communities have become increasingly aware that computer simulation is an indispensable tool for resolving a multitude of scientific and technological problems. It is clearly desirable to gain a reliable perspective on the behaviour of a system early in the design stage, long before building costly prototypes Chul and Ro 2002 Letherwood, Gunter et al. 2004 Makarand Datar 2007 Ersal, Fathy et al. 2008 Mueller, Ferris et al. 2009. Simulation tools have become a critical part of the automotive industry due to their ability to reduce the time and money spent in the development process. Terrain is the principle source of vertical excitation to the vehicle and must be accurately represented in order to correctly predict the vehicle response in simulation. In this dissertation, non-deformable terrain surfaces are defined as a sequence of vectors where each vector comprises terrain heights at locations oriented perpendicular to the direction of travel. The evolution and implications of terrain surface measurement techniques and existing methods for correcting INS drift are reviewed as a framework for a new compensation method for INS drift in terrain surface measurements. Each measurement is considered a combination of the true surface and the error surface defined on a Hilbert vector space, in which the error is decomposed into drift global error and noise local error. It is also desirable to develop a compact, path-specific terrain surface representation that exploits the inherent anisotropicity in terrain over which vehicles traverse.

Subject Categories:

  • Numerical Mathematics
  • Computer Programming and Software

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE