Accession Number:

ADA533557

Title:

A Seat at the Table. Beyond the Air Component Coordination Element

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

AIR AND SPACE POWER JOURNAL MAXWELL AFB AL

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2010-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

4.0

Abstract:

Planning and executing combat operations demand trust and coordination at all levels - especially at the senior-leader level. Clearly, General MacArthur trusted Lt Gen George Kenney, the senior Airman in the Pacific during World War II. Their relationship and the success of MacArthurs Pacific campaign stemmed from frequent and meaningful interaction between the two men and their staffs, underwritten by access to resources and authorities. As MacArthur island-hopped through the Pacific, Kenney moved his headquarters forward, bringing combat capability and resources with him and directing the employment of airpower along the way. The relocation of headquarters proved critical at a time when the ability to communicate and interact was primarily a function of distance. Although modern technology significantly reduces the need for close proximity to sustain communication or to command and control airpower, it comes with a cost. Todays state-of-the-art combined air and space operations center CAOC and its communications capabilities allow Airmen to make full use of the inherent flexibility, speed, range, and mobility of airpower. The CAOC, however, lacks the portability that would allow a combined force air component commander CFACC to colocate with every ground commander the price tag for such redundancy in both personnel and equipment far exceeds the benefits.

Subject Categories:

  • Administration and Management
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE