Accession Number:

ADA528871

Title:

Operation Weserubung and the Origins of Joint Warfare

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC INST FOR NATIONAL STRATEGIC STUDIES

Report Date:

1993-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

13.0

Abstract:

The German military genius for maneuver warfare is well illustrated by an often overlooked operation of World War II, the invasion of Scandinavia in 1940. Operation Weserubung also warrants examination because it was joint in execution and demonstrates that the German army, navy, and air force--Wehrmacht, Kriegsmarine, and Luftwaffe--could fight as a team even if rivalry among the headquarters of the services made Hitler the operations unified commander by fault. A combination of speed, surprise, and daring enabled the German armed forces to defy the Royal Navy by transporting troops directly to their objectives along the Norwegian coast. Furthermore, quickness and dash baffled the hapless Norwegians and beleaguered Allied forces. The lessons of this operation were not lost on the British for the balance of the war and remain relevant today as a case study in joint warfare and the operational art.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE