Accession Number:

ADA528812

Title:

United Nations Peacekeeping: Ends versus Means

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC INST FOR NATIONAL STRATEGIC STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1993-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

11.0

Abstract:

The end of the Cold War has seen the United Nations assume a more active role in resolving regional conflicts. In the last four years alone U.N. forces have mounted over a dozen military operations, more than in the previous four decades. Many of todays operations are greater in scope and complexity than in the past, and their nature is changing from peacekeeping to peace-enforcing. As a result the Secretary-General recommends expanding U.N. military capabilities. While Washington officially pledged support for a stronger and more forceful United Nations, the resources to achieve that objective are not available. The most immediate requirement is for a command and control structure for properly employing multinational forces. Moreover, there is a view that divergent U.N. and U.S. military cultures could inhibit American participation in future peacekeeping missions under U.N. control. Even if our military contributions to future combined operations are small, such missions will continue to pose a significant challenge to the way the U.S. Armed Forces currently plan and train for coalition warfare.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE