Accession Number:

ADA526816

Title:

Decontamination of Explosive Contaminated Structures and Equipment

Descriptive Note:

Conference paper

Corporate Author:

ARMY TOXIC AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AGENCY ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND MD

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

1990-08-01

Pagination or Media Count:

8.0

Abstract:

As a result of past operations, the U.S. Amy has numerous buildings and large quantities of process equipment that are contaminated with explosives. Recent changes in laws also require all detonation scrap to be free of explosive residue prior to recycle. Before these materials can be recycled or disposed of, the residual explosives must be removed. Removal of residual explosives is necessary to avoid creating safety and environmental hazards. If the process equipment is to be land filled, residual explosives may migrate into the soil and ultimately contaminate groundwater. Building structures that have been used for explosives manufacture are usually slated for demolition and disposal of the rubble. Demolition of a building that has residual explosives can be dangerous. Disposal of contaminated rubble may contribute to soil and groundwater contamination. Probably the two most common methods in present use for decontamination are steam cleaning and decontamination by fire burn it to the ground. Steam cleaning is in most cases effective but provides only surface decontamination and is not effective on hard to access areas. It is difficult to completely decontaminate concrete with steam. Steam cleaning of complex items such as motors cannot assure that interior areas are cleaned. Burning of structures contaminated with explosives is no longer an environmentally acceptable method of decontamination. In 1982, USATHAMA began a project aimed at developing new, improved procedures for decontaminating structures and equipment contaminated with explosives. The goal of this on-going project is to develop a method which will be safe, produce little or no waste, and will assure a high degree of decontamination. The process would have to be effective at removing contaminants from metal, wood, painted concrete, and bare concrete. The first phase of this project is a review of existing techniques and the consideration of novel techniques.

Subject Categories:

  • Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering and Control of Production Systems
  • Safety Engineering
  • Logistics, Military Facilities and Supplies
  • Ammunition and Explosives
  • Environmental Health and Safety

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE