Accession Number:

ADA523296

Title:

NATO's European Members: Partners or Dependents

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV NORFOLK VA JOINT ADVANCED WARFIGHTING SCHOOL

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2003-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

12.0

Abstract:

The transatlantic relationship is fraying at the edges. The Europeans are increasingly uneasy over the George W. Bush administrations national security policy, judging by the pronouncements coming from government officials. While the tragedies of 11 September 2001 garnered Americans broad sympathy in Europe, emotional support since has steadily eroded. What had been European sympathy on a personal level to American pain and suffering is gradually giving way to anxiety about this nations preponderance of global power, mixed with an awareness--if in many instances only subconsciously--of Europes own shortcomings, particularly in the realm of international security. Certainly, European capitals are lending a hand in the diplomatic, intelligence, and police work needed to track and round up al-Qaida operatives who use Europe as a hub for international operations. Nevertheless, Europeans are weary of an American war on terrorism that has become an open-ended campaign that may drift into areas where European and American interests diverge. They are uneasy that Washington may have cast too wide a net in labeling North Korea, Iraq, and Iran as constituting an axis of evil. The Europeans fear that the American ego has been unduly inflated by the impressive military campaign that ousted the Taliban regime in Afghanistan and disrupted the al-Qaida network, and that the victory of sorts in Afghanistan will fuel American ambitions to take on their erstwhile enemy Saddam Hussein. While Washington is inclined to see the advantages of Saddams removal from power, the Europeans dwell on potential dangers of unintended consequences, particularly the negative impact of an American military campaign on Arab political opinion toward the West. Even the most stalwart of American allies in Nato, the United Kingdom under Prime Minister Tony Blair, is facing an uphill battle in persuading its public of the wisdom of taking on Saddam.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Military Forces and Organizations

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE