Accession Number:

ADA523257

Title:

The Army and Space, 1958-1984

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

ARMY SPACE AND MISSILE DEFENSE COMMAND/ARMY FORCES STRATEGIC COMMAND HUNTSVILLE AL

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2004-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

4.0

Abstract:

The Armys interest in exploiting Space has its roots in the ways it has used technology to enhance combat power, always seeking the highest ground to dominate the battlefield. It has used new technology to enhance functions rather than merely seeking improved equipment. These functions included gathering intelligence to include weather and terrain information and the enemys location, command and control, communicating messages and killing the enemy. These functions give Soldiers increased powers of observation of the terrain, weather and the enemy, and communication, while denying them to an adversary. Today, our use of Space technologies is the result of a convergence of technological change and doctrinal renaissance. While the Army has historically sought to use Space to improve battlefield advantage, it did not play a lead role in the development of technology and use of Space between 1958 and 1984. Space had been divided between the U.S. Air Force and NASA. The Army maintained its interest in Space, but was often relegated to a lesser partner as is explained below. By 1984, Army leaders had reasserted the Armys need to use and develop Space and convinced which leaders to allow the Army to pursue Space. Throughout the Second World War, the Army applied its research and development expertise to radar, photography, signals transmission and intelligence, rocket, missile and aircraft development. By 1945 it had taken, processed and analyzed millions of intelligence photographs and its code breaking capacity allowed American decision-makers to eavesdrop on enemies, allies and neutrals.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE