Accession Number:

ADA523181

Title:

Institutions and Organizations: Exploring the Interdependencies of Legitimacy Theory and Strategic Communication in Afghanistan

Descriptive Note:

monograph

Corporate Author:

ARMY COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFF COLL FORT LEAVENWORTH KS SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2010-04-12

Pagination or Media Count:

57.0

Abstract:

If the Department of Defense DOD better understands what legitimacy is, how strategic communication affects it, and how a prolonged counter-insurgency affects the legitimacy of specific Afghan and US institutions, we will be better prepared to make foreign policy recommendations that involve overt counter-insurgency operations. This understanding can drive DOD perceptions of future conflict, which in turn drives conceptualization and development of future US force structure and capabilities. Ultimately for the US Army, a better understanding of legitimacy and its interdependency with communication could shape our assumptions that drive the development of our US Army Capstone Concept. This study hypothesizes that in Afghanistan, legitimation and strategic communication are inextricably connected. However, strategic communication is overly focused on the external, attempting to influence constituents, and not focused enough on bringing cultural understanding and compromise back to the strategy, goals, and institutions within Afghanistan. Therefore the legitimation of fledgling institutions is slower and more problematic than is necessary. This study concludes that in Afghanistan, the legitimacy and strategic communication theories are deeply interwoven. Yet, the strategic communication process is not focused enough on internalization of socio-cultural norms and mores. This means communicating to understand the culture in order to conduct US and Afghan institutional remodeling, and behavior modification to fit within or work in concert with the current cultural institutions integrating stake-holder perceptions into policy, plans, and operations to support national objectives. Fledgling institutions that do not challenge embedded institutions are more likely to succeed in the long term.

Subject Categories:

  • Government and Political Science
  • Radio Communications

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE