Accession Number:

ADA519223

Title:

Building Maritime Security in Southeast Asia: Outsiders Not Welcome?

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL WAR COLL NEWPORT RI

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2008-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

20.0

Abstract:

Todays globalized economy is intricately interconnected and is heavily dependent on maritime trade in order to sustain the movement of energy, raw materials, and finished goods. The arteries of global trade include the narrow waterways of Southeast Asia, with about a third of the worlds trade and half its oil transiting through the Straits of Malacca and Singapore alone. As China and India continue their strong growth, sea trade through the straits is expected to increase correspondingly. Major economies such as the United States, China, Japan, and India all have stakes in ensuring the safe passage of shipping through the region. The littoral states of Southeast Asia may be the most concerned of all any interruption in shipping would heavily impact their economies by disrupting port operations and the smooth flow of raw materials and finished products. Armed robbery at sea is a persistent problem in the area, and maritime hijackings and kidnappings continue to occur. There are fears that the straits could become a target for terrorism and a haven for illegal trafficking of people and weapons. Many states are interested in the strengthening of maritime security in Southeast Asia in order to protect their trade and prevent illegal activity.

Subject Categories:

  • Economics and Cost Analysis
  • Military Operations, Strategy and Tactics

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE