Accession Number:

ADA517896

Title:

Joint Combat Search and Rescue - Operational Necessity or Afterthought

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIV WASHINGTON DC INST FOR NATIONAL STRATEGIC STUDIES

Report Date:

1998-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

9.0

Abstract:

Military and civilian leaders recognize the need to assign a greater priority to combat search and rescue CSAR. Today a combat rescue has political and military implications that range from the tactical to strategic level. Public concern over casualties can intensify a situation that involves even one American life into a major crisis. Current joint doctrine stresses individual service CSAR that allows a joint effort when service capabilities are exceeded. Although service capabilities are being maintained, the Armed Forces emphasize joint planning, coordination, and execution of such missions as the norm, not the exception. Current doctrine should be revised to furnish reliable and flexible joint CSAR support to both CINCs and other joint force commanders JFCs. The military has conducted a range of operations-occasionally combat-in recent decades. Public support for committing forces has been difficult to achieve and maintain. Airpower is often perceived as a low cost way of demonstrating national will with lower risk than deploying forces on the ground. While the real danger to airmen-who most commonly precipitate CSAR-may appear low, manportable and larger surface-to-air missiles have proliferated.

Subject Categories:

  • Military Forces and Organizations
  • Escape, Rescue and Survival

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE