Accession Number:

ADA517790

Title:

Molecular Memory Circuits Using a Virus as a Template

Descriptive Note:

Journal article

Corporate Author:

NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC CENTER FOR BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Personal Author(s):

Report Date:

2008-01-01

Pagination or Media Count:

4.0

Abstract:

Significant challenges exist in constructing and manipulating the building blocks of a nanoscale device. After such a device is assembled, it is an additional challenge to electronically address or measure responses at the molecular level. We demonstrate the usefulness of individual virus particles as scaffolds to enable design, construction, and measurement of nanoscale molecular electronics memory devices. Such devices are of great interest for their potential to enable lightweight, low-cost, and low-power technologies such as handheld electronic sensors and inexpensive disposable molecular memories. Taking advantage of molecular electronics requires developing novel techniques for organizing nanosized materials into usable devices. As biological interactions are better understood, there has been great interest in using the specificity and strong interactions present in biology for this purpose. By combining the structural specificity provided by biological systems with the material properties of synthetic systems it is possible to develop novel devices on the nanoscale. Using viruses as nanoscale scaffolds for devices offers the promise of exquisite control of positioning on the nanoscale, using a particle that can either interface with lithographically defined structures, or undergo further self-assembly into extended structures by itself. We use cowpea mosaic virus CPMV as a nanoscale scaffold for constructing molecular electronic circuits for use in memory applications. Nanocircuit Assembly Using genetically engineered CPMV allows the generation of specific patterns of functional amino acids, which provide a means to assemble complex structures with high spatial specificity on the nanometer scale. Using genetically engineered CPMV allows the generation of specific patterns of functional amino acids, which provide a means to assemble complex structures with high spatial specificity on the nanometer scale.

Subject Categories:

  • Genetic Engineering and Molecular Biology
  • Electrical and Electronic Equipment

Distribution Statement:

APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE